The Bridge Building Plan

According to the PMBOK, the Project Management Plan defines how the project is executed, monitored, and controlled. Steven Sinofsky, the former President of Microsoft’s Windows division, adds that the how and why of the project is an important piece of the plan. The post, “Engineering and social science lead to plans“, is about projects to build technology products. Its lessons are applicable to all types of projects

The Plan as a Bridge

Bridge of Sighs (Cambridge)The team owns the how and the sponsor owns the why. Sharing these through the plan creates a guideline for the project team and the sponsors.

The team makes choices about the means to produce the deliverables. At the same time, the sponsor is making decisions in response to an ever-changing environment. This makes a shared and detailed sense of the overall plan a critical element for success.

The plan acts as a “framework for making decisions.” To make informed decisions, the team needs to understand the context of the project, the sponsor needs to understand how the solution works. “The point of a plan is to build a bridge made up of the how and why.”

About the Plan

Leaderfoot stepping stones tabletThe article also presents many key aspects of a project plan:

  • The most counter-intuitive notion of a plan is that the presence of a plan means you have the tools to change the plan, together as a team.” — Plans are not chiseled into stone and publishing them provides anchor points that avoid chaos, finger-pointing and accountability dodging.
  • The headline of a plan is a solution to a problem — A plan that gives the objective as a top-line business goal forgets the how. Setting the solution as the goal forgets the why. A plan’s headline needs two legs, the how and the why, to stand.
  • The plan is a team effort  — The best plans are the plans that have the best ideas from the most people and more people contributing is more people with a real commitment to the project.
  • Write down the plan – Slides are summary bullet points. The writing process helps you check the plan for completeness and consistency. It is as important as the contents of the plan.

Starting your plan with the how and why gives context for simpler, better decision-making. Including everyone in the preparation gets buy-in and improves the quality of the plan. Together they help create a plan that makes the execution, the monitoring, and the controlling of the project easier.

Resource Your Project With Peter Drucker’s Help

Plan made of good intentions“The best plan is only good intentions unless it leads into work.” — Peter Drucker, Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices

Commit to the Plan

The first step in getting resources for your project is to get agreement on how to deliver the project. Prepare the approach for delivering your project and call for a meeting with the stated objective of getting agreement on the plan; your unstated objective is getting a commitment for resources.

Prepare the meeting. Make sure you have addressed the concerns of key players. The ask for resources is only done if the team agrees to the plan as a team.

Build a Team Identity

This is also the time to build or reinforce the definition of the group. Identify the meeting and the attendees with a group name, e.g. Project X Sponsors; Project X Steering Committee; Project X Key Stakeholders.

Once you have agreement on the plan, it is time talk about the next actions. Instill a sense of urgency. We have plan, we have agreed it needs to get done; let’s get started on the actions before time is lost.

The Quote

Peter Drucker goes on to explain that the only way a plan will lead into work is through the commitment of key resources to work on specific tasks. The plan is ‘only a plan’ if the project is missing the resources needed to deliver the results.

Set an Example

Start by committing your resources first. If you have an ally, have them commit next. It is important that the team supply their best resources for the job. Anything less and the plan is just good intentions. Anything less is showing a lack of commitment to the freshly agreed plan. The project will struggle to get completed successfully without a show of full commitment.

The Power Behind the Method

This approach leverages, in varying degrees, Robert Cialdini’s six principles of persuasion.

  • Reciprocity – The project manager volunteer’s his best resources first.
  • Commitment and Consistency – We get the team to commit to the plan first.
  • Social Proof – The group commits together to the plan and we ask our ally, a group member, to commit to commit his resources.
  • Authority – Peter Drucker is an authority on management. This will speak louder to the team than project management theory.
  • Liking – We create an atmosphere for mutual liking by identifying the group as a team and approving the plan together.
  • Scarcity – We frame our request in terms of avoiding lost time and taking advantage of an opportunity.

Agree to the plan as a team, ask the team to put their money where their mouths are and you have increased your chances of delivering your project successfully.